Ricotta Gnocchi

050Gnocchi (pronounced neeyo-kee) are small dumplings. They should be light and have a soft texture not dense and rubbery (often the case in many restaurants).

In Italy, gnocchi are eaten as a primo piatto (first course).

Growing up in a Sicilian household, I never ate this Northern Italian specialty until I visited Venice. I was sitting in a small cafe off the grand canal (way off) and witnessed many of the locals enjoying a bowl of fresh ricotta gnocchi. These delicious little dumplings were served in a sea of fresh tomato sauce. Thank heaven there was  a chunk of bread to sop up every last drop of sauce or I might have just licked the bowl clean.

Like most Italian dishes, there are many recipes for gnocchi and they vary from town to town. This recipe is easy to prepare and pairs nicely with a simple tomato sauce that doesn’t overpower, thus, allowing the flavor of  this delicate gnocchi to shine.

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup fresh ricotta
  • 3/4 cup Parmesan cheese grated, plus more for serving
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • Pinch of nutmeg
  • Season with salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • Olive oil for drizzzle
  1. In a small bowl, mix together the ricotta, Parmesan cheese, egg and nutmeg. Season with salt and pepper.
  2. Gently stir in the flour, you want the dough to be soft and hold together (it’s fine if it’s a bit sticky).  Be careful not to over mix (the gnocchi will be tough if you do). Refrigerate 2-3 hours or overnight.

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To form the gnocchi, take a teaspoon, scoop up a bit of dough, use the other spoon to shape the gnocchi into a quenelle (dumpling). If the dough sticks, dip the spoons in cold water first.

 

 

 

To cook the gnocchi, fill a large pan with 3-inches of water, bring to a simmer, (do not boil or gnocchi will fall apart) add salt.

Add several gnocchi to the pan, (they will sink to the bottom) cook 3-5 minutes. (They will float to the surface when they are done).

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To serve, ladle warm tomato sauce into bowls, top with gnocchi, a drizzle of olive oil and a generous amount of finely grated parmesan.

 

 

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5 Responses to “Ricotta Gnocchi”

  1. February 10, 2014 at 9:27 am #

    Hey Catherine:

    I made this last night. Very good. The tomato sauce was interesting: I was pretty sure I was making a tomato stew about an hour into it and wasn’t sure how it would turn out. I had faith, though, and by the end of the 3 hours and after removing the onions (I left the garlic in), I pureed everything in the blender and the sauce was incredibly flavorful. I might put less salt in at first next time and add more at the end as needed, though.

    Anyway, the gnocchi was fantastic. I’m enjoying your site–love everything New Orleans (my godparents were from there). My grandfather came over from Cefalu, Sicily to Virginia in 1901.

    Keep it up.

    Ciao,

    Vince

    • Catherine
      February 11, 2014 at 10:49 am #

      Hi Vince!

      I’m pleases you enjoyed the gnocchi! The sauce is so simple, isn’t it? I usually double the recipe and keep some in the freezer. It’s interesting you mention New Orleans, I’m making a pot of red beans and rice right now!

      Catherine

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